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Trust in a Crab Apple – Divinely guided

Are we divinely guided? According to Flower Therapy, crab apples mean trust.

I’m always amazed at the synchronicity in life. You know when something just falls into place or you realise a deeper meaning.

When first writing my manuscript Alurea Quest (or The Quest of Jesse Greene) I drew on a childhood memory of playing in the crab apple trees of my auntie’s farmhouse. I remember an early photo of me aged perhaps six or seven, with rosy red cheeks perched high in the tree. The sourness and misshapen wonder of the fruit have stayed a vivid memory to this day.

Doing a rewrite of the story some five years after finishing the first draft, I took a break and picked up the Flower Therapy book by Doreen Virtue and Robert Reeves. I had borrowed from the local library and opened it one night, rather surprised to find Crab Apple among the flower entries.

Reading the descriptions I was even more surprised at the meanings and how fitting they were to both the story and my current situation.

Its energetic properties included: “Trust … following guidance, brainstorming new concepts, and sharing your ideas with the world.”

All these are major themes in Alurea Quest – Heart of the Maya. It is at the crab apple tree that Jesse has to trust Percival Mouse and follow his guidance. This is where he must trust the path ahead of him.

According to Angel Therapy’s Doreen Virtue, Crab Apple is associated with Archangel Gabriel – the Divine messenger and angel of communication. A good companion for any writer.

Flower Therapy continues: “This flower confirms you’re on the right path and encourages you to continue. The main theme of Crab Apple is trust: you are asked to have faith in the guidance that you’ve been given. It won’t be long until your idea is ready to be shared with the world.”

It was the perfect choice for this part in Jesse’s journey. Looking at it now, I believe Gabriel must have had a hand in it. As Doreen writes: “This arch­angel acts like a Heavenly agent and manager who motivates you to polish your skills. Gabriel then opens the door of opportunity for you to work in your chosen career, and gives you a loving push through it if you hesitate.”

Reading Crab Apples message came at just the right time, as I was doing the rewrite under pressure to enter the State Literary Awards:

“Trust in your new idea, as it is no ordinary one; rather, it’s Divine inspiration … I’m here to confirm this for you, and assure you that you’re making the right decision. I’ll guide you as you move forwards with this idea. It may be time to come to fruition, so please be patient. I will bring you the tools, people and money you need… you’re ready to break through your walls. Show the world the beautiful idea you’re bringing into it.” – Flower Therapy

It certainly gave me the inspiration to push through. I’m at the halfway point with less than a week to finish the rewrite.

Wish me luck – and I’m trusting Gabriel has my back.

Today I Choose Life

“Today I choose life. Every morning when I wake up I can choose joy, happiness, negativity, pain… to feel the freedom that comes from being able to continue to make mistakes and choices – today I choose to feel life, not to deny my humanity but to embrace it” – Kevyn Aucoin

The Quest of Jesse Greene – Heart of the Maya

A powerful Mayan artifact catapults Jesse into a strange wilderness where he must face his darkest fears with only his wits to survive. Guided by the wisdom of animals he encounters along the way, he finds courage to meet the Gatekeeper’s challenge – but will he find his way home?

Keep updated on all the characters and story developments with a new Quest of Jesse Greene category on my blog site as I bring this multidimensional story into our reality.

Join me for a journey through time and space. It’s exciting and inspirational!

– SM Scott

World Water Day – March 22, 2015

The clouds are busy today, building and shifting with the tempting promise of rain. Billowing white in places with a smudging of grey undertones. The potential is there, hope is there. It’s timely perhaps as today is March 22, 2015 – World Water Day.

Water is an amazing substance – it is the only liquid that expands as it freezes and can exist in the three states of matter at the same time – liquid, solid and vapour. Take some time to appreciate water today. It it vital for life – give it the respect it deserves.

Isabella Falls

http://eartheasy.com/live_water_saving.htm has some good water saving ideas such as this one –   Use your water meter to check for hidden water leaks
Read the water meter before and after a two-hour period when no water is being used. If the meter does not read exactly the same, there is a leak.

I like to keep a bucket under a gutter outlet to catch rainwater to water my potplants – the plants grow much better as the rain is alive with vitality and free from the chemicals of our water treatment systems.

Integrity breeds trust – writing with discernment

We are bombarded with so many ideas these days that sometimes you don’t know what to think. We live in a time when choice is rampant. Enthusiasm can sometimes override common sense as marketing gurus and politicians know just the right buttons to push.
We are told sometimes you have to believe before you can see: “Beliefs are limiting”. In the face of quantum theory it seems almost anything is possible and time-honoured ideas are being challenged. The food pyramid has been turned on its head. Economic models need re-modelling to consider factors such as air and water quality, lifestyle and mental health impacts, which had previously been left out of the equation.
Statistics can be made to say different things depending on your perspective. So who’s words can you trust?
Conversely, in this age of instant communication, are you sharing with integrity? Can your words be trusted? What is your goal as a writer?

Writing consistently with integrity, sharing ideas of what is true for you breeds a sense of authenticity, trust and respect among your readers.
In the age of political correctness no one whats to be seen as judgmental. But there is a serious need for discernment, while also not taking oneself too seriously. Our truths can change.

“How does it FEEL”

Some years ago when I was editing a spiritual magazine I was caught up in the dilemma of what to publish and what not to. Some of the articles that came across my desk got me so worked up – but being “judgmental” was the big evil of the day. I sought advice from a source I trusted, one that I felt had great integrity.
The response was: “Go with the truth as you feel it. To be judgmental is simply to say ‘this is right and this is wrong’. To be discerning is to say, ‘well this is really a lot of nonsense, but that is alright because it is someone else’s sovereign right to be really stupid if they want’.”
I asked: “How do you KNOW what’s the truth?”
“How does it FEEL,” he replied.
I thought of one contributor with a bit of a following who had some ‘out-there’ ideas, “It doesn’t feel good,” I admitted.
“So go with the feeling, and if it does not feel good then leave it alone. Alright? You know, there is a lot of stupidity about. And you know all of this New Age business, all of this great race for enlightenment, is all very well – but you know, it is about being sensible too. Again one does not preclude the other, you see,” he explained.
“But how do I know I’m right?” I pleaded.
“Go with the feeling. It is people’s own learning to read and judge for themselves. You do what you want. You do not have to pander to other people’s stupidity. And being stupid is alright. There is nothing ‘wrong’ with it,” he said.
“If it is that you only produce that which ‘feels’ like wisdom then you are being of benefit to people. If your truth changes tomorrow, that is alright. Then tomorrow you do it different.”
“Is that not forcing your truth on others?” I asked.
“They do not have to read your magazine!” was the hearty reply.
I laughed. It was so true. We all have the choice of what to “put in our pie” as Esther Hicks’ Abraham would say.

Be-happy-signI have several authors in whom I have faith to give me direction when I am feeling confused. The book Seth Speaks – The Eternal Validity of the Soul by Jane Roberts is one such book. In fact I have the whole Seth collection; as well as Conversations with Seth by Susan M. Watkins, who was among the ESP group who met to hear Seth’s words in the early 1970s.

So who do you turn to when facing the tough questions?

 

When life gets too much

When life gets you down take comfort in the thought that this too will pass- Picture credit: Jon Eckert

A young girl in our beautiful valley has taken her own life. What makes a 13-year-old feel their predicament is so hopeless? Why didn’t she talk to someone who could help?
Could this tragedy have been prevented?
It seems farmers are also killing themselves at the rate of one every four weeks in Queensland, politicians say. They see no future what with overwhelming debts, drought and death all around them. But we always have choice, even when we don’t know it.
We are losing too many individuals – be they young or older – and whatever talents and creativity they may have enriched our world with. Is it overwhelm? Hopelessness?
I have my bad days but when I do I think “This too shall pass” (an old Persian saying about the inevitable nature of change).
And you know what – it always does.
Take heart and reach for hope any way you can.

Dreaming of Dolphins – a plight interwoven

Last night I dreamed of dolphins. I followed a concrete pathway down a steep bank to an abandoned wooden structure which used to be a watery abattoir where dolphins were killed. The water’s surface was littered with light debris which I couldn’t really identify, perhaps leaves but with a sense of pollution about it which left me feeling sad. However then I brightened up as a pod of dolphins appeared in the water. I was amazed and overjoyed that they could come back to this place of such negativity and still be so friendly and playful. I watched the dolphins for ages, admiring their sleek forms and playfulness, overjoyed at the feelings they inspired in myself. There were baby dolphins there as well and I was able to touch them and have them gather around me until the caretaker of the place told me it was time to leave. A sadness overcame me as I knew I had to go. What would happen to these dolphins now? What was their fate amid this pollution?

Upon waking I had several thoughts. There was the feeling of joy the dolphins inspired which made me question: “Where is the joy in my daily life?” What can I do to feel like that more often.

Then there was the memory of the annual Japanese dolphin slaughter – was this what the dream was also symbolic of? If you haven’t heard the story check out the Sixty Minutes’ segment aired Feb 23 called The Killing Cove  at http://sixtyminutes.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=8804712

Dolphins are not just another animal. They are sentient beings, so intelligent and so inspiring, they deserve to be treated so much better than to be slaughtered like fish for food that many people would be loathe to eat or just to steal their young for the profit of the aquarium trade.

There was another layer to my dream I believe that spoke of the compassion and willingness of dolphins to return to that place of killing (an abattoir in the dream; the Killing Cove in Japan) and endure that negativity so that we humans can feel their joy again and reconnect with our playfulness.

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I was fortunate enough to interact with a wild dolphin at Monkey Mia in Western Australia many years ago (pictured above) and the memory of it is a real treasure in my heart.  I hope other people can experience that joy and wonder in future years as well.

Karumba surprise

ImageCrocs, prawns and barramundi aren’t all that the Gulf town of Karumba in northwest Queensland has to offer. I was recently surprised to see the diversity of wildlife on a Savannah Way drive out that way hosted by Tropical Tourism North Queensland (TTNQ for short).

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It was the time of the June “super moon” – the moon being at its closest distance to Earth – and we were treated to a beautiful sunset, moonlit night and stunning moon-set the next morning (pictured) as fishing boats headed out to sea at all hours.

Fishing is a big drawcard for the Gulf of Carpentaria, but take care, the reminder that this is croc country can’t be missed by the 8.63m Krys croc statue (pictured top) on show in nearby Normanton’s main street. The original crocodile was shot by a woman, Krystina Paulokski, on the banks of the Normanton River in 1957. The river empties into the Gulf of Carpentaria at Karumba, some 832km from our starting point on the eastern coast at Cairns. For travellers short on time, Skytrans has regular flights from Cairns to Normanton, with car hire available.

Karumba isn’t just for the fishing enthusiasts, although it certainly reels them in every year. Birdlife abounds, including the tall grey brolgas on the Muttonhole Wetlands, which extend some 30km inland. There’s a great little waterhole near the road at Karumba Point where pink galahs gather in the evening to drink and wading birds can be seen in droves in the early morning, sifting through the shallows.

Kites gather on the powerlines around the town like pigeons do in other cities. Agile wallabies dart across the golf course and feed by the roadside at dusk.

We head for the boat ramp as fishermen return with their catch, one visitor proudly lifting two barramundi from the large coolbox in his dinghy. Others are casting for bait as pelicans wander the beach in the hope of an easy feed.

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The town has good accommodation for anglers, from the character holiday unit of Bunratty Castle (pictured above), built from bricks carried four at a time by bicycle from the old town meat works, to multiple caravan parks and the spacious Ash’s Holiday Units and Café, which has rooms for up to six people and does a massive cooked breakfast to keep you going all day.

As the sun sinks lower, the focus shifts to Karumba Point. Watching the sun set over the water, some three days after watching it rise over the Coral Sea north of Cairns at Palm Cove, is a fitting end to this segment of the Savannah Way drive. In between is a wealth of open skies, surprising natural encounters and a rich mining and pastoral history.

Hope you can come and explore it too some day soon (dry season or winter is the best time).

Check out drivenorthqueensland.com.au for trip ideas.